Legislative Alert for February 23, 2020

The 2020 Legislative Session started on Monday, January 13, 2020 and is scheduled to end on Thursday, March 12, 2020.  As this is a short session, bills are moving rapidly through the session. 

This Friday, February 28, 2020 is the last date for bills in the opposite houses from their origin to pass out of committee except for those in the House fiscal committees and Senate Ways and Means and Transportation Committees.

March 2, 2020 is the last day for bills in the opposite house to pass out of the House fiscal committees and Senate Ways & Means and Transportation committees.

March 6, 2020 at 5 PM is the last day to pass opposite house bills (except initiatives and alternatives to initiatives, budgets and matters necessary to implement budgets, differences between the houses, and matters incident to the interim and closing of the session).

March 12 is the last day allowed for regular session under state constitution

You can contact your legislators by calling the Legislative Hotline at 1 800-562-6000.  You can also contact them by e-mail using this format:  firstname.lastname@leg.wa.gov.  If you need to look up your legislators, use the following link to find them: http://app.leg.wa.gov/DistrictFinder/

Top Actions of the Week:

SB 6073 Providing menstrual hygiene products in public school bathrooms.

SB 6073 was amended to require that all public school that serve youth in grades 6-12  by the beginning of the 2021-22 school year make menstrual hygiene products available at no cost in at least 2 bathrooms or 50% of bathrooms (whichever is greater) at the school.  A nurse’s office may count as one of the bathrooms.

Status: :  SB 6073 has passed out of the Senate and has yet to be assigned to a committee in the House according to the legislative website.

Action:  Contact your representatives and let them know that you support SB 6073 and request it be assigned to a committee, and have a public hearing and executive session by Friday, February 28 to pass it out and on to the House Rules Committee so that it can be considered by the full House.

If you can only do one thing, please contact your legislators to support SB 6073 and request that it be scheduled for a public hearing and executive session by Friday, February 28.  Many students have missed class time, left school early, or missed school entirely because they do not have access to menstrual hygiene products.. Some students who are low-income may struggle to afford these products. Access to necessary hygiene supplies should not be an impediment to an education

You can contact your legislators by calling the Legislative Hotline at 1 800-562-6000.  You can also contact them by e-mail using this format:  firstname.lastname@leg.wa.gov.  If you need to look up your legislators, use the following link to find them: http://app.leg.wa.gov/DistrictFinder/

Note:  Committee members for House and Senate Committees are listed at the end of this alert. 

We have also included hyperlinks on each of the bill actions below, which will take you to the WA State Legislature’s comment page for the bill where you can enter your support or opposition to the bill and include a comment (up to 1000 characters).

Civil and Equal Rights

WA State Office of Equity

HB 1783 Creating the Washington state office of equity.

SUPPORT

HB 1783 establishes the Washington state office of equity to promote access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, including racial and ethnic disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across all sectors of government.  The bill also requires all state agencies to apply an equity lens to agency decision-making; designate a diversity, equity, and inclusion liaison; develop plans for diversity, equity, and inclusion and for language access; and collaborate with the Equity Office to develop performance measures.

Status:  HB 1783 is in the Senate State Government, Tribal Relations & Elections Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session on Wed, February 26 at 8 AM and Friday, February 28 at 1:30 PM.

Action:  Contact your senators on the Senate State Government, Tribal Relations & Elections Committee and let them know that you support  HB 1783 and ask for a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

WA State Women Veterans License Plate

HB 2187 Creating Washington State Women Veterans License plate.

SUPPORT

HB 2187 creates a special license plate recognizing the efforts of women veterans in Washington state.

Status:  HB 2187 passed out of the House on a unanimous vote and is now in the Senate Transportation Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 3:30 PM.

Action:  Contact your senator on the Senate Transportation Committee and let them know you support HB 2187 and request it be scheduled for an executive session to pass out of committee.

Felons Voting Rights

SB 6228 Restoring voter eligibility for all persons convicted of a felony offense who are not in total confinement under the jurisdiction of the department of corrections.

SUPPORT

SB 6228 changes the voting rights law to automatically restore a felon’s voting rights as long as the defendant is not in total confinement with the Department of Corrections.  It states that a person serving a term of community custody is not considered to be in total confinement of the Department of Corrections and does not include confinement imposed as a sanction for a community custody violation.  A person who has had their voting rights restored must reregister to vote before voting.

Status:  SB 6228 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the Senate by the February 19 cutoff date for bills to pass their house of origin.

Public Disclosure and Election Security

HB 2293 Exempting election security information from public records disclosure.

SUPPORT

HB 2293 exempts from public disclosure security audits, security risk assessments, or security test results relating to physical security or cybersecurity of election operations or infrastructure and those portions of records containing information about election infrastructure, election security, or potential threats to election security, the public disclosure of which would have a substantial likelihood of increasing risk to the integrity of election operations or infrastructure.

Status:  HB 2293 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the House by the February 19 cutoff date for bills to pass their house of origin.

Voting Rights Opportunities  for Youth

SB 6313 Increasing opportunities for young voters.

SUPPORT

SB 6313 allows individuals to vote in a primary election if they are 17 years old, but will be 18 by the general election.  They also require the Department of Licensing to provide an automated process for voter registration when receiving or renewing enhanced driver’s licenses or identicards.  Each public university with 5000 or more students must open a student engagement center which provides ballots and voter registration materials.  These student engagement centers may be open on the eight business days prior to and on the election day.  The university can contract with the county auditor to operate these centers.  The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in collaboration with the County Auditors and League of Women Voters must identify and make available civics materials for high school courses.

Status: 

SB 6313 has passed out of the House State Government and Tribal Relations Committee and is likely to be sent to the House Appropriations Committee for their consideration.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Appropriations Committee and let them know that you support SB 6313.

Courts Open to All Act

HB 2567 Concerning open courts.

SUPPORT

HB 2567 prohibits warrantless civil arrests. Prohibiting these civil arrests at courthouses is necessary for immigrant survivors to be able to get help for the abuse they are experiencing.  The Legislature makes findings on the following: the importance of keeping Washington courts open, accessible, and free from interruption; that civil arrests at court facilities create a climate of fear that deters residents from interacting with the justice system; and that it is imperative to ensure that all members of the community feel safe coming to, remaining at, and returning from court.

Status:  HB 2567 passed the House and is now in the Senate Law and Justice Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 10 AM and an executive hearing on Thursday, February 27 at 10 AM.

Action:  Contact your senators on the Senate Law and Justice Committee  and let them know that you support HB 2567 and ask for a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Redistricting Commission

HB 2575 Concerning reforms to increase transparency and accountability of the Washington redistricting commission.

SUPPORT

HB 2575 modernizes the state’s Redistricting Commission to increase transparency and accountability and maximizes public input.  This bill does the following:

  • Begins the Commission earlier with the appointment of four full time commissioners moved to Dec 1 of the year ending in 0 and their selection of the chair by January 1 of the year ending in 1.  These commissioners must hold two rounds of public hearings in each congressional district.  The bill further outlines how this public input must be done to assure input from diverse voices and communities
  • Before any public forum is held, the Commission must publish a report detailing its priorities and intentions for using redistricting criteria in its decision-making process. Any preliminary plan and reasonably final plan must be made public to allow for public review and comment. And the final report that accompanies the redistricting plans must include  a) a summary of all public input received; b) all plans discussed by the full Commission; c) a summary of the data used to create those plans; d) analyses of the maps using specified redistricting metrics; e) a written explanation if an alternative plan furthers redistricting criteria more than the final plan; and f) any other information that provides the basis on which the Commission made its decisions.
  • Gives people with limited English a better chance to engage with the commission by requiring translation services and notices in major languages.

Status:  HB 2575 passed out of the House and is now in the Senate State Government, Tribal Relations & Elections Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Wednesday, February 26 at 8 AM and an executive session on Friday, February 28 at  1:30 PM.

Action:  contact your senators on the Senate State Government, Tribal Relations &  Elections Committee and let them know that you support HB 2575 and ask for a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Prohibiting Private Detention Facilities

HB 2576 Concerning private detention facilities.

SB 6442 Concerning private detention facilities.

SUPPORT

HB 2576 and SB 6442 ban any person, business, or state or local governmental entity from operating a private detention facility within the state or entering into agreements with any local or state government or private organization in any other state providing for the operation of a private detention facility.  A private detention facility that is operating with valid contract prior to Jan 1, 2020 may continue for the duration of the contract, not including extension or modifications to or authorized by the contract.

Status:  HB 2576 passed out of the House and is now in the Senate Human Services, Reentry & Rehabilitation Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 1:30 PM

SB 6442 passed out of the House and is now in the House Public Safety Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 3:30 PM and an executive session on Thursday, February 27 at 8:00 AM.

Action:  Contact your senators on the Senate Human Services, Reentry & Rehabilitation Committee and let them know you support HB 2576 and request that it scheduled for an executive session and passed out of committee with a YES vote.

Contact your representatives on the House Public Safety Committee and let them know that you support SB 6442 and request a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Hair Discrimination

HB 2602 Concerning hair discrimination.

SUPPORT

HB 2602 would prohibit hair discrimination.  Currently WA State Law Against Discrimination (WLAD) includes prohibitions for discrimination on the basis of race; creed; color; national origin; families with children; sex; marital status; sexual orientation; age; the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability; or the use of a trained guide dog or service animal by a disabled person.

This bill would amend the definition of race in the WLAD to include traits historically associated or perceived to be associated with race. This would include, but would not be limited to, hair texture and protective hairstyles such as afros, braids, locks, and twists.

Status:  HB 2602 is in the Senate Rules Committee where it can be scheduled for a vote by the full Senate.

Action:  Contact your senator and let them know you support HB 2602 and ask that HB 2602 be pulled to the floor for a vote by the full Senate.

Pregnancy Discrimination

SB 6034 Extending the time allowed to file a complaint with the human rights commission for a claim related to pregnancy discrimination.

SUPPORT

SB 6034 extends the time allowed for a person to file a pregnancy discrimination complaint with the human rights commission within one year after the alleged unfair practice.

Status:  SB 6034 is now in the House Labor & Workplace Standards Committee where it is scheduled for an executive hearing on Wednesday, February 26 at 8 AM and again on Friday, February 28 at 8 AM.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Labor and Workplace Committee and let them know you support SB 6034 and request a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Consumer Rights

Debt buyers

HB 2476 Concerning debt buyers.

SUPPORT

HB 2476 this bill applies to collection agencies and creates a licensing system for collection agencies. No person or business may act as a collection agency without first acquiring a license from the Department of Licensing.  This collection agency act sets forth a number of prohibited practices including

  • contacting a debtor with excessive frequency or at an unreasonable hour,
  • publishing an individual’s debt or sharing the amount due with a third party, or
  • misrepresenting themselves when communicating with a debtor.

Status:  HB 2476 one of the strongest in the nation PASSED the House unanimously! It has now moved on to the Senate Rules Committee where it can be scheduled for a vote by the full Senate.

Action Contact your senator to let them know that you support HB 2476 and ask that it be pulled to the floor for a vote and passed into law.

Working Family Tax Credit & Individual Tax Identification Numbers

HB 2521 Adding individual tax identification number filers to the working families tax credit.

SB 6557 Adding individual tax identification number filers to the working families tax credit.

SUPPORT

HB 2521 and SB 6557 add people who file taxes using an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to the Working Families Tax Credit statute.   ITIN which is issued by the IRS for the purpose of filing a tax return and is used in place of a social security number (SSN) to file a tax return when not eligible for a SSN.  ITIN filers represent many groups of taxpayers, including:

• Undocumented immigrants

• Certain student visa holders

• Some spouses and children of people with employment visas

• Some victims of domestic violence

Everyone who pays taxes should get the Working Families Tax Credit.

Status:  Both bills are closely tied to the ongoing revenue conversations.  Both in this format are now DEAD as they failed to pass out of their house of origin by cutoff date.

Excessive Property Tax Delinquency Penalties

SB 6314 Protecting taxpayers from home foreclosure.

SUPPORT

SB 6314 eliminates the 3% and 8% property tax delinquency penalties that are currently added on top of the allowed 12% interest. Losing your home due to delinquent property tax disproportionately harms seniors and families of color and contributes to the racial wealth gap.

Status:  SB 6314 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the Senate by cutoff date.

Pay to Pay

HB 2635 Concerning collection agency transaction fees for processing electronic payments.

OPPOSE

HB 2635 allows debt collectors to charge for use of credit card on each transaction. 

 provide a sales and use tax exemption for diapers for both adults and infants.

  • These bills would remove the consumer gains from last year of lowering the interest rate on debt collection from 12% to 9%. Here’s why.  If a debt collector can charge 2.35% fee on each transaction and they set up a payment plan the consumer would pay, for example, $70 on a $50/month payment plan for a $3000 debt which is almost the same as if they had been charged the higher interest rate. 
  • Debt collectors already get a 9% interest rate and a whopping 50% on some public debt.
  • Getting pushed to pay with a credit card when you are already in debt is adding to financial problems.
  • Using the “free” options of payment require going into the office, paying for postage or getting money orders that cost money so aren’t realistic or necessarily free.
  • Debt collectors also want to be paid immediately, that is why they call debtors to get payment, don’t fool yourself, they WANT people to pay by electronic means.

Status:  HB 2635 has passed out of the House and is in the Senate Financial Institutions, Economic Development & Trade Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 8 AM.

Action Contact your senator on the Senate Financial Institutions, Economic Development & Trade Committee to let them know that you OPPOSE HB 2635 and request a NO vote should an executive session be scheduled.

Economic Equity and Support for Low Income Individuals and Families

Child support pass-through payments

SB 5144 Implementing child support pass-through payments.

SUPPORT

SB 5144 requires the Department of Social and Health Services to pass through a portion of child support collections for families receiving assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. The federal Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 allows states to pass through up to $100 per month of collected child support to TANF families with one child and up to $200 per month of collected child support to TANF families with two or more children without having to reimburse the federal government for its share of the child support collected. This is known as the child support pass through. States that opt to implement the child support pass through must disregard the child support collection paid to the family in determining the family’s cash TANF benefit. Washington implemented child support pass-through payments in October 2008 but suspended the child support pass-through payments effective May 1, 2011.  SB 5144 was amended in committee and requires the Department of Social and Health Services to pass through child support up to $50 per month collected on behalf of a family, or up to $100 a month for a family that includes two or more children.

Status:  SB 5144 is in the House Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 10 AM.  It is then scheduled for an executive session on Wednesday, February 26 at 8 AM and again on Friday, February 28 at 8 AM.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee and let them know that you support SB 5144 and ask that they pass it out of committee.

Unemployment benefits for persons with family responsibilities

HB 1445 Making unemployment benefits accessible to persons with family responsibilities and other availability issues and making clarifying changes.

SB 5473 Making unemployment benefits accessible to persons with family responsibilities and other availability issues and making clarifying changes.

SUPPORT

Both HB 1445 and SB 5473 make changes to the unemployment insurance program which would allow a good cause consideration for receiving unemployment benefit to include that the separation from work was necessary because care for a child or vulnerable adult in the claimant’s care is inaccessible. The claimant must have made reasonable effort to preserve the employment status by requesting leave or changes in working conditions or schedule that would accommodate the situation. Good cause also includes alteration to the claimant’s usual work shifts making care for a child or vulnerable adult inaccessible. Good cause separation related to the death, illness, or disability for an immediate family member is changed to a family member.

Status:  HB 1445 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the House by the cutoff date for bills to pass their house of origin

SB 5473 is in the House Labor and Workplace Standards Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session on Monday, February 24 at 1:30 PM

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Labor and Workplace Standards Committee and let them know that you support SB 5473 and request a YES  SB 5473 to pass it out of committee.

Leave accrual for government employees

HB 2264 Increasing the cap on accrued vacation leave.

SUPPORT

HB 2264 increases the accrued vacation leave limit for employees of offices, departments and institutions of the state government from 240 to 280 hours.

Status:  HB 2264 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the House by the cutoff date for bills to pass their house of origin.

Breast milk expression

HB 2266 Concerning reasonable accommodation for the expression of breast milk without requiring written certification from a health care professional.

SUPPORT

HB 2266 prohibits an employer from requiring written certification from the employee’s health care provider regarding the need for a reasonable accommodation to express breast milk.

Status:  HB 2264 in in the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session on Monday, February 24 at 10 AM

Action:  Contact your senator on the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee and let them know you support HB 2266 and ask for a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Child Support

HB 2302 Concerning child support, but only with respect to standards for determination of income, abatement of child support for incarcerated obligors, modification of administrative orders, and notices of support owed.

REQUEST AMENDMENT

HB 2302 makes modification to child support standards.  It clarifies the standard used to determine what constitutes full time employment for calculation of work, how to impute income for a parent who is voluntarily unemployed or underemployed and adds criteria which imputes income for a voluntarily unemployed or underemployed full time high school student 20 hours per week at minimum wage – this imputation is rebuttable.  The bill also recognizes that an individual who is incarcerated for 6 months or more frequently owe significant child support debts and such debts severely impact the individual’s ability to have a successful reentry and reintegration into society.  The bill allows for an automatic abatement within a child support order where there is a rebuttable presumption that an incarcerated person is unable to pay the child support obligation. Unless the presumption is rebutted, the child support obligation would be abated to ten dollars per month while the individual is incarcerated.  The bill also allows for a motion to be filed to reverse or terminate an abatement during the period of incarceration by demonstrating that the incarcerated person has possession of, or access to, income or assets available to provide support while incarcerated.   Where abatement is determined to be appropriate, the child support obligation is abated to $10 per month, regardless of the number of children covered by the order.  Abatement continues until the last day of the third month after the person is released from confinement, at which point the support obligation is reinstated at 50% of the underlying support obligation, but not less than the presumptive support obligation of $50 per month per child

WA State NOW is concerned about families in the middle may be at jeopardy of eviction due to the inability to pay for their housing, possible loss of job for not being able to afford transportation, loss of care for their children from not being able to pay the cost of child care, loss of utilities, possible homelessness, and/or loss of medical care with the loss of child support.

We are requesting that before the portion regarding abatement of child support payments for incarcerated individuals is implemented that the Department of Child Support conduct a study looking at the impact of this changes in procedure.

Status:  HB 2302 is in the Senate Law & Justice Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session on Thursday, February 27 at 10 AM.

Action:  Contact your senators on the Senate Law and Justice Committee and let them know you have concerns in regard to HB 2302.  Request that the bill be amended to require the Department of Child Support conduct a study looking at the impact and any mitigation for abatement of a child support order for incarcerated individuals.

Domestic Workers Labor Protections

HB 2511 Providing labor protections for domestic workers.

SB 6247 Providing labor protections for domestic workers.

SUPPORT

HB 2511 and SB 6247 require that a domestic worker  who works as a nanny, house cleaner, home care worker, cook, gardener, household manager or other domestic service worker must be receive the following protections:

A hiring entity employing a domestic worker must:

  • pay at least minimum hourly wages;
  • pay overtime wages for hours worked in excess of 40 hours per work week;
  • allow for uninterrupted meal breaks of at least 30 minutes if the domestic worker works five or more hours;
  • allow for 10 minute rest breaks if the domestic worker works more than three hours;
  • permit the domestic worker to cook and consume the domestic worker’s own food, with reasonable restrictions allowed, for domestic workers living in the home of their hiring entity; and
  • keep and maintain records documenting hours worked, pay rate, and if applicable, the leave time earned and used.

The employer may not:

  • request that a domestic worker allow the hiring entity to take possession of the worker’s personal effects, including any legal documents such as passports or other forms of identification;
  •  subject a domestic worker to conduct that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment;
  • monitor or record the domestic worker using the bathroom or changing clothes;
  • monitor or record, or interfere with private communications;
  • communicate an intent to inform a government entity about the citizenship or immigration status of a domestic worker or the worker’s family member, in response to the domestic worker exercising any of the worker’s rights; or
  • take any adverse action against a domestic worker for exercising his or her rights, including the right to organize, participate in political speech, disclose immigration status, or institute any proceeding under the law

The bill also requires that the employer must have a written agreement with the employee regarding terms of employment and expectations.  A two week notice must be provided before terminating employment except for live-in domestic workers where a minimum of a four week notice is required.   Circumstances are outlined when no notice is required.

Status:  HB 2511 passed out of the House and is now in the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee where it is scheduled for both a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 8:00 AM and then for an executive session that afternoon at 12 PM.

SB 6247 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the Senate by the cutoff date for bills to pass their house of origin.

Action:  Contact your senator on the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee and let them know you support HB 2511 and request a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Workplace Safety

SB 6122 Protecting temporary workers.

SUPPORT

SB 6122 modifies the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act to require a staffing agency to visit the worksite employer’s actual workplace to review safety and health practices and hazards and then provide training to the employee for industry specific hazards the employee may encounter at the worksite.  The training must be completed annually and in the preferred language of the worker.  Training must be during work hours and at no cost to the employee.

Status:  SB 6122 in in the House Labor and Workplace Standards Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session on Monday, February 24 at 1:30 PM

Action:  Contact your representative on the  House Labor and Workplace Standards Committee and let them know that you support SB 6122 and request a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Higher Education Access

SB 6141 Expanding access to higher education.

SUPPORT

SB 6141 recognizes the increasing importance of a postsecondary education as well as the financial barriers faced by many students who want to pursue a postsecondary education.  This bill establishes a means to share information about new financial aid opportunities and increase awareness of what is available including the expanded Washington college grants.  This bill requires the development of a centralized online statewide calculator tool for estimating combined financial aid packages from the federal Pell grant and the Washington college grant program for all public four-year institutions of higher education in Washington state. The calculator must be designed for anonymous use and may not be used to collect or share data.  It also requires that all school districts beginning in 2020-21 school year in coordination with the office of superintendent of public instruction facilitate a financial advising day with all high schools in each district.

Status:  SB 6141 has passed out of the Senate and is now in the House College and Workforce Development Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 1:30 PM and two executive sessions – one on Wednesday, February 26 at 1:30 PM and the second on Thursday, February 27 at 1:30 PM.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House College and Workforce Development Committee and let them know that you support SB 6141 and request a YES vote to pass it out of Committee.

Reproductive Rights and Health Care

Feminine hygiene sales tax exemption

HB 1053 Providing a sales and use tax exemption for feminine hygiene products.

SUPPORT

HB 1053 provides a sales and use tax exemption for feminine hygiene products.

Status:  HB 1053 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the House by the cutoff date for bills to pass out of their house of origin.

Patient protection

HB 1608 Protecting patient care.

SUPPORT

HB 1608 prohibits a health care entity from limiting a health care provider’s provision of accurate and comprehensive information to patients about the patient’s health status, treatment options, and information regarding the Death with Dignity Act, if the provider is acting in good faith, within the provider’s privileges, and within the accepted standard of care.  It also requires the Department of Health (DOH) to create and make available online materials to inform health care providers and staff of the authority to act under these provisions, which health care entities must provide to privileged or employed health care providers and staff. And it requires the DOH to create materials for providers and patients about the Death with Dignity Act.

Status:  HB 1608 is in the Senate Health and Long Term Care Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session for Monday, February 24 at 1:30 PM.

Action:  Contact your senators on the  Senate Health and Long Term Care Committee  and letting them know that you support HB 1608 and ask that it pass out of committee with a YES vote.

Comprehensive Sex Education

SB 5395 Concerning comprehensive sexual health education.

SUPPORT
SB 5395 requires every public school district to provide a comprehensive sexual health education as an integral part of the curriculum that is evidence-informed, inclusive for all students regardless of their protected class status, skills-based, and meets other requirements including:

  • encourages healthy relationships based on mutual respect and affection and are free from violence, coercion, and intimidation;
  • teaches how to identify and respond to attitudes and behaviors contributing to sexual violence;
  • emphasizes the importance of affirmative consent, meaning conscious and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity, as a requirement before sexual activity; and is consistent with the health and physical education learning standards, which must be available on OSPI’s website.

The amended SB 5395 requires that the comprehensive sexual health education  be phased in for students in grades 6 through 12 by Sept 1, 2020 and for K through 5 by Sept 1, 2021.

Status:  SB 5395 is in the House Education Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session on Thursday, February 27 at 8 AM.

Action:  Contact your representatives in the House Education Committee and let them know that you support SB 5395 and ask that it be passed out of committee with a YES vote.

Pelvic Exam Consent

SB 5282 Requiring informed consent for pelvic exams.
SUPPORT
SB 5282 Prohibits a licensed health care provider from knowingly performing or authorizing a student practicing under their authority to perform a pelvic examination on a patient who is anesthetized or unconscious.

Status:  SB 5282 passed out of the House Health Care and Wellness Committee and is likely to be sent directly to the House Rules Committee where it can be scheduled for a vote by the full House.

Action:  Contact your representatives and let them know that you support SB 5282 and request that it be pulled to the floor for a vote by the full House.

Menstrual Hygiene Products in Public School Bathrooms

SB 6073 Providing menstrual hygiene products in public school bathrooms.

SUPPORT

SB 6073 was amended to require that all public school that serve youth in grades 6-12  by the beginning of the 2021-22 school year make menstrual hygiene products available at no cost in at least 2 bathrooms or 50% of bathrooms (whichever is greater) at the school.  A nurse’s office may count as one of the bathrooms.

Status:  SB 6073 has passed out of the Senate and has yet to be assigned to a committee in the House according to the legislative website.

Action:  Contact your representatives and let them know that you support SB 6073 and request it be assigned to a committee, and have a public hearing and executive session by Friday, February 28 to pass it out and on to the House Rules Committee so that it can be considered by the full House.

Cost-sharing for insulin products

SB 6087 Imposing cost-sharing requirements for coverage of insulin products.

SUPPORT

SB 6087 requires any health plan issued or renewed after January 1, 2021 that provides coverage for  insulin drug that it must cap out of pocket expenses at $100.00 per thirty-day supply. Beginning Jan 1, 2022 for every $100 increase in the whole cost, a health plan may submit a request to the insurance commissioner to increase the out of pocket cost by $5.00. 

Status:  SB 6087 has passed out of the Senate and is now in the House Health Care and Wellness Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 1:30 PM.  It is then scheduled for two executive sessions – the first on Wednesday, February 26 at 1:30 PM and then again on Thursday, February 27 at 1:30 PM.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Health Care and Wellness Committee and let them know you support SB 6087 and ask for a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Prescription Drug Affordability Board

SB 6088 Establishing a prescription drug affordability board.
SUPPORT
SB 6088 establishes a prescription drug affordability board with responsibilities to identify prescription drugs and biological products that are of a high cost or where the drug has increased in prices for a thirty-day supply by two hundred percent or more in a 12 month period. The board can conduct cost reviews of drugs meeting the criteria in the bill. 

(1) The board must establish a process for setting upper limits for prescription drugs that the board has determined have led or will lead to excess costs to the state or patients. 

(2)Any state agency administering a state purchased health care program shall not pay an amount above the upper payment limit set by the board for a prescription drug.

(3) The process must take into consideration:

(a) The cost of administering the drug;

(b) The cost of delivering the drug to patients; and 

(c) Other relevant administrative costs related to the production and delivery of the drug.

(4) The process must provide for the suspension of an upper payment limit if a drug is placed on the food and drug administration shortage list.

(5) The board must monitor the supply of drugs for which it sets an upper payment limit and may suspend that limit if there is a shortage of the drug in the state.

Status:  SB 6088 has passed out of the Senate and is now in the House Health Care and Wellness Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Wednesday, February 26 at 1:30 PM an executive session on Thursday, February 27 at 1:30 PM.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Health Care and Wellness Committee and let them know you support SB 6088 and ask for a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Insulin Purchasing Program

SB 6113 Creating a central insulin purchasing program.

SUPPORT

SB 6113 establishes a central insulin purchasing program to allow the northwest prescription drug consortium to act as the single purchaser of insulin for the state thus leveraging the buying power of all insulin purchasers in the state with the goal of lowering the cost of insulin.

Status:  SB 6113 has passed out of the Senate and is now in the House Health Care and Wellness Committee where it is scheduled for a public hearing on Tuesday, February 25 at 1:30 PM.  It is then scheduled for two executive sessions – the first on Wednesday, February 26 at 1:30 PM and then again on Thursday, February 27 at 1:30 PM.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Health Care and Wellness Committee and let them know you support SB 6113 and ask for a YES vote to pass it out of committee.

Postpartum Medicaid Coverage

SB 6128  Extending coverage during the postpartum period.

SUPPORT

SB 6128 expands Medicaid coverage to one year after a pregnancy ends instead of the current limit of 60 days.  The bill also directs the health care authority to submit a waiver request to the federal centers for Medicare and Medicaid services to allow the state to receive federal match for the coverage of pregnant and postpartum persons.

Status: SB 6128 has passed out of the Senate and is now in the House Appropriations Committee where it can be scheduled for a public hearing and executive session..

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Appropriations Committee and let them know that you support SB 6128 and ask that it be scheduled for a public hearing and executive session to pass it out of committee.

Violence Against Women

Extreme Risk Protection Orders

SB 5745 Concerning extreme risk protection orders.

SUPPORT
SB 5745 directs the court to consider relevant evidence regarding a threatened hate crime in determining whether to issue an extreme risk protection order. And it replaces language referring to dangerous mental health issues with language addressing behaviors that present an imminent threat of harm to self or others.

Status:  SB 5745 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the Senate by the cutoff date for bills to pass their house of origin.

Assault weapons and large capacity magazines

HB 2240 Concerning high capacity magazines.

SB 6077 Concerning high capacity magazines.

SUPPORT
HB 2240 and SB 6077 make it unlawful for a person to manufacture, possess, distribute, import, transfer, sell, offer for sale, purchase, or otherwise transfer a large capacity magazine (defined as accepting more than 10 rounds of ammunition), except as specifically authorized. Allows a person who legally possessed a large capacity magazine on the effective date of the act, or a person who inherits a legally possessed large capacity magazine, to continue to possess the large capacity magazine subject to certain restrictions in that it cannot be sold or transferred to any other person in WA other than a licensed dealer, a licensed gunsmith for purposes of service or repair, or a law enforcement agency for the purpose of relinquishment of the magazine.  It must be stored in a secure storage and may be possessed only on the property or immediately controlled by the person, while engaged in the use of the large capacity magazine at a licensed firing range, while engaged in a lawful outdoor activity such as hunting, or while traveling to or from these locations. It also establishes a number of exemptions from the prohibitions relating to large capacity magazines for certain persons and entities.

Status:  HB 2240 and SB 6077 are DEAD as they failed to pass out by the cutoff date for bills to pass out of their house of origin.

Human Trafficking

HB 2320 Requiring training on human trafficking.

SB 6356 Requiring training on human trafficking.
SUPPORT
HB 2320 and SB 6356 require all transient accommodations to provide annual training on human trafficking to their employees.  The training must cover 1) the differences between sex and labor trafficking, 2) guidance specific to public lodging sector on identifying human trafficking, 3) guidance on responding to suspected trafficking, 4) contact information of a national human trafficking hotline and appropriate local law enforcement agency.  By January 1, 2021 every operator of a transient accommodation must conspicuously post signage for their employees regarding human trafficking awareness. The Department of Health may not renew or issue a license to an applicant without first receiving written confirmation that the training, signage, and procedures for reporting have been met.

Status:  HB 2320 is in the Senate Law & Justice Committee where it is scheduled for an executive session on Thursday, February 27 at 10 AM.

SB 6356 is DEAD as it failed to pass out of the Senate by the cutoff date for bills to pass out of their house of origin.

Action:  Contact your senators on the Senate Law and Justice Committee and let them know that you support HB 2320 and request that they pass it out of committee.

Model Sexual Assault Protocols

SB 6158 Concerning model sexual assault protocols for hospitals and clinics.
SUPPORT
SB 6158 establishes a sexual assault coordinated community task force within the attorney general’s office to develop model protocols ensuring that adult or minor sexual assault victims receive a coordinated community response when presenting for care at any hospital or clinic following a sexual assault. The task force is to report it its findings and recommendation to the legislature and governor by December 1st of each year with the task force expiring on Dec 31, 2022.

Status:  SB 6158 is in the House Public Safety Committee where it is scheduled for two executive sessions – the first on Tuesday, February 25 at 3:30 PM and the second on Thursday, February 27 at 8 AM.

Action:  Contact your representatives on the House Public Safety Committee and request that SB 6158 be  passed out of committee.

Budget

Working to pass new progressive policies and demonstrating continued investment in our state is important.  However, in order to ensure these policies, have adequate funding, we must advocate for a healthy budget that invests in our schools, protects the most vulnerable and supports families and those they love.  We must support measures that aim to restructure our regressive tax system that currently relies the most heavily on taxes from the least affluent. 

This session the legislature will be making changes to the budget passed last year with a supplemental budget to make corrections and adjustments. It must be noted that the legislature adopted in 2019 a budget that did not include any significant revenue.  With no additional revenue even though there were some enhancements new initiatives have basically been impossible.  The proposed carbon tax and capital gains tax were not approved, and neither were major changes to the tax exemptions that could have increased revenue.  Since 2020 is the second half of the biennium it is unlikely that these revenues will be approved this session.

The legislature is also dealing with the passage of I-976 which has resulted in an injunction that the court imposed preventing its implementation until a court decision is made.  And until the final decision is made, jurisdictions and the state are developing strategies to continue to collect the full amount of the pre-initiative car tab fees or not.  Even with these constraints there does not appear to be any momentum to use our general fund monies to support transportation.

In order for our communities to thrive, our lawmakers must generate new resources from our richest residents who have some of the lowest overall state and local tax rates.  We need to encourage our legislators to tax capital gains (which are highly concentrated with those at the top of the income scale in the state).  As noted by the Washington State Budget and Policy Center, “A tax on capital gains would help lawmakers pay for tax credits and programs that would benefit women, nonbinary and trans people, and other communities overrepresented among households with low incomes. Legislators do not have to sacrifice revenue in order to reduce the strain of our tax code on Washingtonians with low incomes. Enacting a tax on capital gains – which are profits from the sale of corporate stocks, bonds, and other financial assets – would generate revenue to fund an expanded Working Families Tax Credit and reinvest in WorkFirst/TANF. And the tax would almost exclusively be paid by Washington’s millionaires, who have benefited most from the thriving economy we all help to build and maintain.

A short legislative session should not get in the way of advancing gender equity in Washington. Lawmakers can and must take these steps to address gender- and race-based economic inequities exacerbated by our tax code.”

What actions can you take with your representatives and senators now?

  1. Tell them that you support a capital gains tax.
  2. Encourage them to pass legislations such as that in HB 1703 which would increase transparency regarding tax exemptions and accountability.  This would require that the Department of Revenue report on all tax exemptions and their fiscal impact every two years instead of the current four years.  Every tax exemption that has no sunset and reduces revenue by over $50,000 annually would appear in the budget document and would have to be proactively reauthorized as part of the budget or it would sunset.
  3. Foreclosure prevention funding: Sen. Mullet has put in an operating budget request for $1.82 million in the supplemental budget. Other members can sign on to that request. Rep. Orwall is circulating a sign on letter to support her budget request. Please ask your senators to contact Sen. Mullet’s office to sign on to the foreclosure prevention budget request and ask your house members to contact Rep. Orwall and sign on to the foreclosure prevention budget request support letter!

On Friday, February 21, 2020 the WA State Economic & Revenue Forecast Council forecasted an increase of $606 million for the 2021-23 biennium and $321 million for the 2023-25 biennium.  Also, this week, Boeing requested that the state rescind Boeing’s tax exemption which is also likely to increase revenue.  This in addition to the increase in monies noted in the revenue forecast will make the  budget appropriations go a little smoother.  Appropriations bills will come out on Monday in both the House and the Senate with public hearings early in the week.

This surplus revenue projection and the recension of Boeing’s tax exemption  is not an excuse to shy away from meaningful tax reform.  We are continuing to have declining state tax revenues as noted in the graph below.  Let your representatives and senators know that you support actions to address the regressive taxes as listed above.

Graph of declining state revenues from the WA State Budget & Policy Center showing decrease from 6.8% (1995) to 4.9% (2023) as a share of total state personal income by fiscal year.

HOUSE COMMITEES

Appropriations Committee:
Timm Ormsby (Chair), June Robinson (1st Vice Chair), Steve Berquist (2nd Vice Chair), Drew Stokesbary, Drew MacEwen, Skyler Rude, Michele Caldier, Bruce Chandler, Frank Chopp, Eileen Cody, Laurie Dolan, Mary Dye, Joe Fitzgibbon, Drew Hansen, Larry Hoff, Zach Hudgins, Christine Kilduff, Vicki Kraft, Nicole Macri, Gina Mosbrucker, Eric Pettigrew, Gerry Pollet, Cindy Ryu, Joe Schmick, Tana Senn, Larry Springer, Mike Steele, Pat Sullivan, Robert Sutherland, Gael Tarleton, Steve Tharinger, Mike Volz, and Alex Ybarra

Capital Budget Committee:
Steve Tharinger (Chair), Beth Doglio (Vice Chair), , Richard DeBolt, Norma Smith, Mike Steele, Lisa Callan, Chris Corry, Lauren Davis, Mary Dye, Carolyn Eslick, Chris Gildon, Morgan Irwin, Bill Jenkin, Mari Leavitt, Debra Lekanoff, Jacquelin Maycumber, Melanie Morgan, Mike Pellicciotti, Strom Peterson, Marcus Riccelli, Sharon Tomiko Santos, Mike Sells, Monica Jurado Stonier, and Jim Walsh

Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee
Christine Kilduff (Chair), My-Linh Thai (Vice Chair), Morgan Irwin, Jeremie Dufault, Roger Goodman, Jenny Graham, Drew Hansen, Steve Kirby, Brad Klippert, Tina Orwall, Strom Peterson, Matt Shea, Javier Valdez, Amy Walen, and Alex Ybarra

College and Workforce Development Committee:
Drew Hansen (Chair), Debra Entenman (Vice Chair), Mari Leavitt (Vice Chair), Luanne Van Werven, Chris Gildon, Jenny Graham, Steve Berquist, Vicki Kraft, Jared Mead, Dave Paul, Gerry Pollet, Bill Ramos, Skyler Rude, Mike Sells, Vandana Slatter, Robert Sutherland, and Jesse Young

Commerce and Gaming Committee:
Strom Peterson (Chair), Drew MacEwen, Kelly Chambers, Brian Blake, Bill Jenkin, Steve Kirby, Shelley Kloba, Melanie Morgan, Brandon Vick, and Jesse Young

Consumer Protection and Business Committee:
Steve Kirby (Chair), Brandon Vick, Larry Hoff, Andrew Barkis, Brian Blake, Davin Duerr, Jeremie Dufault, Cindy Ryu, Sharon Tomiko Santos, Mike Volz, Amy Walen, and Alex Ybarra

Education Committee:
Sharon Tomiko Santos (Chair), Laurie Dolan (Vice Chair), Dave Paul (Vice Chair), Mike Steele, Bob McCaslin, Mike Volz, Steve Berquist, Michelle Caldier, Lisa Callan, Chris Corry, Paul Harris, Christine Kilduff, Vicki Kraft, Lillian Ortiz-Self, Skyler Rude, Monica Jurado Stonier, My-Linh Thai, Javier Valdez, and Alex Ybarra

Environment & Energy Committee:
Joe Fitzgibbon (Chair), Debra Lekanoff (Vice Chair), Matt Shea, Mayr Dye, Matt Boehnke, Richard DeBolt, Beth Doglio, Jake Fey, Jared Mead, June Robinson, and Sharon Shewmake

Finance Committee:
Gael Tarleton (Chair), Amy Walen (Vice Chair), Ed Orcutt, Jesse Young, Mike Chapman, Noel Frame, Nicole Macri, Tina Orwall, Larry Springer, Drew Stokesbary, Brandon Vick, and Sharon Wylie   

Health Care and Wellness Committee:
Eileen Cody (Chair), Nicole Macri (Vice Chair), Joe Schmick, Michelle Caldier, Kelly Chambers, Frank Chopp, Lauren Davis, Richard DeBolt, Paul Harris, Jacquelin Maycumber, Marcus Riccilli, June Robinson, Monica Jurado Stonier, My-Linh Thai, and Steve Tharinger

Housing, Community Development and Veterans Committee:
Cindy Ryu (Chair), Melanie Morgan (Vice Chair), Bill Jenkin, Chris Gildon, Andrew Barkis, Debra Entenman, Noel Frame, and Mari Leavitt

Human Services and Early Learning Committee:
Tana Senn (Chair), Lisa Callan (Vice Chair), Noel Frame (Vice Chair), Tom Dent, Carolyn Eslick, Bob McCaslin, Chris Corry, Roger Goodman, Dan Griffey, Christine Kilduff, Brad Klippert, John Lovick, & Lillian Ortiz-Self

Innovation, Technology and Economic Development Committee:
Zach Hudgins (Chair), Shelley Kloba (Vice Chair), Norma Smith, Matt Boehnke, Vandana Slatter, Gael Tarleton, Luanne, Van Werven, and Sharon Wylie

Labor and Workplace Standards Committee:
Mike Sells (Chair), Mike Chapman (Vice-Chair), Gina Mosbrucker, Bruce Chandler, Mia Gregerson, Larry Hoff, and Timm Ormsby

Local Government Committee:
Gerry Pollet (Chair), Davina Duerr (Vice Chair), Vicki Kraft, Dan Griffey, Sherry Appleton, Keith Goehner, and Tana Senn

Public Safety Committee:
Roger Goodman (Chair), Lauren Davis (Vice Chair), Sherry Appleton (2nd Vice Chair), Brad Klippert, Robert Sutherland, Jenny Graham, Dan Griffey, John Lovick, Tina Orwall, Mike Pellicciotti, and Eric Pettigrew

Rules Committee:
John Lovick (Acting Chair), Steve Berquist, Kelly Chambers, Mike Chapman, Chris Corry, Lauren Davis, Noel Frame, Chris Gildon, Paul Harris, Christine Kilduff, Joel Kretz, Jacqueline Maycumber, Lillian Ortiz-Self, Tina Orwall, Eric Pettigrew, Marcus Riccelli, Skyler Rude, Larry Springer, Monica Jurado Stonier, Pat Sullivan, Robert Sutherland, Mike Volz, J. T. Wilcox, and Sharon Wylie

Rural Development, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Committee:
Brian Blake (Chair), Sharon Shewmake (Vice Chair), Bruce Chandler, Tom Dent, Mike Chapman, Mary Dye, Joe Fitzgibbon, Joel Kretz, Debra Lekanoff, Ed Orcutt, Erick Pettigrew, Bill Ramos, Joe Schmick, Larry Springer, and Jim Walsh

State Government and Tribal Relations Committee:
Mia Gregerson (Chair), Mike Pelliciotti (Vice Chair), Jim Walsh, Keith Goehner, Sherry Appleton, Laurie Dolan, Zack Hudgins, Gina Mosbrucker, and Norma Smith

Transportation Committee:
Jake Fey (Chair), Sharon Wylie (1st Vice Chair), Vandana Slatter (2nd Vice Chair), Javier Valdez (2nd Vice Chair), Andrew Barkis, Jim Walsh, Jesse Young, Matt Boehnke, Kelly Chambers, Mike Chapman, Tom Dent, Beth Doglio, Davina Duerr, Jeremie Dufault, Debra Entenman, Carolyn Eslick, Keith Gohner, Mia Gregerson, Morgan Irwin, Shelley Kloba, John Lovick, Bob McCaslin, Jared Mead, Ed Orcutt, Lillian Ortiz-Self, Dave Paul, Mike Pellicciotti, Bill Ramos, Marcus Riccelli, Matt Shea, Sharon Shewmake, and Luanne Van Werven

SENATE COMMITTEES

Agriculture, Water, Natural Resources and Parks Committee:
Kevin Van De Wege (Chair), Jesse Salomon (Vice Chair), Judy Warnick, Jim Honeyford, John McCoy, Christine Rolfes, and Shelly Short

Behavioral Health Subcommittee to Health & Long-Term Care Committee:
Manka Dhingra (Chair), Keith Wagoner, Jeanne Darneille, David Frockt, and Steve O’Ban

Early Learning and K-12 Committee:
Lisa Wellman (Chair), Claire Wilson (Vice Chair), Brad Hawkins, Jeff Holy, Sam Hunt, John McCoy, Mark Mullet, Mike Padden, Jamie Pedersen, Jesse Salomon, and Keith Wagoner

Environment, Energy, and Technology Committee:
Reuven Carlyle (Chair), Liz Lovelett (Vice Chair), Doug Ericksen, Phil Fortunado, Sharon Brown, Mona Das, Steve Hobbs, Marko Liias, John McCoy, Joe Nguyen, Ann Rivers, Tim Sheldon, Shelly Short, Derek Stanford, and Lisa Wellman

Financial Institutions, Economic Development and Trade Committee:
Mark Mullet (Chair), Bob Hasegawa (Vice Chair), Lynda Wilson, John Braun, Mona Das, Doug Ericksen, and Steve Hobbs

Health and Long Term Care Committee:
Annette Cleveland (Chair), Emily Randall (Vice Chair), Steve O’Ban, Randi Becker, Steve Conway, Manka Dhingra, David Frockt, Karen Keiser, Ron Muzzall, Ann Rivers, and Kevin Van De Wege

Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee:
Emily Randall (Chair), Derek Stanford (Vice Chair), Jeff Holy, Sharon Brown, Doug Ericksen, Marko Liias, and Lisa Wellman

Housing Stability and Affordability Committee:
Patty Kuderer (Chair), Mona Das (Vice Chair), Hans Zeiger, Jeanne Darneille, Phil Fortunato, Rebecca Saldaña, and Judy Warnick

Human Services, Reentry & Rehabilitation Committee:
Jeanne Darneille (Chair), Joe Nguyen (Vice Chair), Maureen Walsh, Annette Cleveland, Steve O’Ban, Claire Wilson, and Hans Zeiger

Labor and Commerce Committee:
Karen Keiser (Chair), Steve Conway (Vice Chair), Curtis King, John Braun, Rebecca Saldaña, Mark Schoesler, Derek Stanford, Maureen Walsh, and Lisa Wellman

Law & Justice Committee:
Jamie Pedersen (Chair), Manka Dhingra (Vice Chair), Mike Padden, Jeff Holy, Patty Kuderer, Jesse Salomon, and Lynda Wilson

Local Government Committee:
Dean Takko (Chair), Jesse Salomon (Vice Chair), Shelly Short, Jim Honeyford, Sam Hunt, and Liz Lovelett

Rules Committee:
Cyrus Habib (Chair), Karen Keiser (Vice Chair), Mark Schoesler, Randi Becker, Andy Billig, Reuven Carlyle, Annette Cleveland, Bob Hasegawa, Curtis King, Patty Kuderer, Marko Liias, John McCoy, Joe Nguyen, Ann Rivers, Tim Sheldon, and Shelly Short

State Government, Tribal Relations & Elections Committee:
Sam Hunt (Chair), Patty Kuderer (Vice Chair), Hans Zeiger, Ron Muzzall, Bob Hasegawa, Brad Hawkins, and Dean Takko

Transportation Committee:
Steve Hobbs (Chair), Rebecca Saldaña (Vice Chair), Tim Sheldon, Annette Cleveland, Curtis King, Mona Das, Phil Fortunato, Liz Lovelett, Joe Nguyen, Steve O’Ban, Mike Padden,  Emily Randall, Dean Takko, Claire Wilson, and Hans Zeiger

Ways & Means Committee:
Christine Rolfes (Chair), David Frockt (Vice Chair, Operating, Capital Lead), Mark Mullet (Capital Budget Cabinet), John Braun, Sharon Brown, Jim Honeyford, Randi Becker, Andy Billig, Reuven Carlyle, Steve Conway, Jeanne Darneille, Manka Dhingra, Bob Hasegawa, Sam Hunt, Karen Keiser, Marko Liias, Ron Muzzall, Jamie Pedersen Ann Rivers, Mark Schoesler, Kevin Van De Wege, Keith Wagoner, Judy Warnick, and Lynda Wilson

Hint:  You can view bills by going to the following website and plug in the bill number for which you want to view the history and status:
http://dlr.leg.wa.gov/billsummary/

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